Genpo Roshi Admits Affair, Disrobes As Buddhist Priest

Genpo Roshi Admits Affair, Disrobes As Buddhist Priest

Feb 11

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OWNING MY RESPONSIBILITY
A Personal Statement from Genpo Merzel

Original Link

I have chosen to disrobe as a Buddhist Priest, and will stop giving Buddhist Precepts or Ordinations, but I will continue teaching Big Mind. I will spend the rest of my life truly integrating the Soto Zen Buddhist Ethics into my life and practice so I can once again regain dignity and respect. My actions have caused a tremendous amount of pain, confusion, and controversy for my wife, family, and Sangha, and for this I am truly sorry and greatly regret. My behavior was not in alignment with the Buddhist Precepts. I feel disrobing is just a small part of an appropriate response.

I am also resigning as an elder of the White Plum Asanga. My actions should not be viewed as a reflection on the moral fabric of any of the White Plum members.

As Genpo Merzel, I will continue to bring Big Mind into the world and to train and facilitate people who wish to study with me. I will not give up on, and will still be available for people who wish to continue studying with me as just an ordinary human being who is working on his own shadows and deeply rooted patterns.

With great humility I will continue to work on my own shadows and deeply rooted patterns that have led me to miss the mark of being a moral and ethical person and a decent human being. I appreciate all the love and support as well as the criticism that has been shared with me. Experiencing all the pain and suffering that I have caused has truly touched my heart and been the greatest teacher. It has helped open my eyes and given me greater clarity around my own dishonest, hurtful behavior as well as my sexual misconduct. I recently entered therapy and plan to continue indefinitely with it. I am in deep pain over the suffering I have caused my wife, children, students, successors and Sangha.

With Sadness and Love,
D. Genpo Merzel

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RELATED LINKS:

Wikipedia on Dennis Genpo Merzel
Big Mind Website

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Disrobing Genpo
By Brad Warner
Elephant Journal
February 9, 2011

Original Link

Famous Zen Master Genpo Roshi has announced that he is disrobing.

For those not acquainted with obscure Buddhist twists on familiar phraseology, to “disrobe” as a Buddhist monk means that you formally quit the Buddhist order and give up your status as a priest and/or monk. Ironically, it was disrobing that got him into trouble in the first place. It seems that Genpo, who is married, had an affair with the woman he was grooming to be his successor.

Genpo Roshi put a short essay explaining his side of the story entitled “Owning My Responsibility” on his website. It said in part, “I have chosen to disrobe as a Buddhist Priest, and will stop giving Buddhist Precepts or Ordinations, but I will continue teaching Big Mind®. I will spend the rest of my life truly integrating the Soto Zen Buddhist Ethics into my life and practice so I can once again regain dignity and respect. I will not give up on, and will still continue to be available for people who wish to continue studying with me as just an ordinary human being who is working on his own shadows and deeply rooted patterns… that have led me to miss the mark of being a moral and ethical person and a decent human being. Experiencing the pain and suffering that I have caused has truly touched my heart and been the greatest teacher. It has helped open my eyes and given me greater clarity around my own dishonest, hurtful behavior as well as my sexual misconduct. I am in deep pain over the suffering I have caused my wife, children, students, successors and Sangha.”

It’s signed “With Sadness and Love.” Isn’t that just the most precious and special thing you’ve ever read in your entire life? Feh.*

Some of you reading this probably already know that I have been highly critical of Genpo Roshi for a number of years [as has elephant, from time to time. – elephant ed.]. In March of 2007 I published an essay on the Suicide Girls website titled “Big Mind® is a Big Load® of Horseshit“. In that essay I took Genpo to task for teaching a ridiculous technique that he claimed in his literature at the time could give a person a true Buddhist enlightenment experience in just a few hours. Not long after that Genpo introduced a new, extra special version of the Big Mind® seminars for which he charged $50,000 per person. I spoke out about that as well. In 2008, the folks in Genpo’s organization came after me for daring to criticize their teacher in the comments section of this Elephant Journal piece.

Now Genpo’s sexual misconduct has been found out and he’s all contrite and lovingly sad about it. Yet he promises he will still continue teaching Big Mind® and he will truly integrate Soto Zen Buddhist Ethics into his life. There is something seriously wrong with this picture. Deeply, deeply wrong.

Maybe I’m just weird. But Genpo’s affair seems like a pretty minor thing. Which is not to say I think it’s fine and dandy. But it’s a matter between him and his wife and his lover. I’ve come to believe quite strongly that monogamy is not at all the natural condition of human beings, despite what we’ve been told for so many years. For some people it comes effortlessly. For others it is absolutely impossible. I think for most of us it is possible, but extremely difficult. When I hear that someone has failed at it I am never shocked or surprised.

I understand that Genpo presented himself as a happily monogamously married family man and that these new revelations have shown this to have been a lie. I can see why people are upset at finding out that a man they trusted to lead them to the Ultimate Truth could not even tell the conventional/relative truth about his marital situation. Even so, the man’s sexual infidelities and his dishonesty about them, as bad as they are, are not even close to what I perceive as his most damaging misconduct.

People are falling all over themselves to congratulate Genpo for disrobing and “doing the right thing.” I don’t see it that way at all. Doing the right thing would have been remaining as a monk and ending the whole Big Mind® program. By leaving the Buddhist community, Genpo has now put himself beyond the reach of the only people who could legitimately criticize Big Mind®. I expect to see Big Mind® get even bigger and cause more destruction. Even absent the Big Mind® nonsense, remaining in the Buddhist order would have been the best way to address the other matters. Now that he’s on his own, Genpo has no one to answer to and can become as big of a cult leader as he pleases. That’s what typically happens in cases like this.

As usual when a sex scandal hits the news, this one has been accompanied by a whole series of other revelations. A former insider in Genpo’s organization stated on Facebook that Genpo’s community “has given him (Genpo) enough money to have three houses, two new cars and a Harley Davidson, not to mention a couple hundred thou a year salary and all expenses.” Yikes!

This all just has me scratching my head and furrowing my brow. Maybe I simply do not comprehend how normal people think. Because very little of this makes any sense to me at all. I get that the whole love affair thing was hidden. I get that people didn’t know about it till now. But this financial stuff had to have been all right out in the open. Genpo’s community didn’t know he had three houses, two new cars and a Harley? Really? Even I have seen photos of him on the Harley. And yet nobody noticed any problem with this? Seriously? That’s your story?

Look. I am not insisting all Zen monks take a vow of absolute poverty and live on just what they can carry in a knapsack slung over their backs like the monks in ancient China did. I know we’re living in a completely different society than they were. I own three bass guitars, a used PT Cruiser, and a ten-speed bike. I wouldn’t want to have to stuff those in a knapsack. But three houses? For the love of God, who needs three houses? I don’t even have one!**

Genpo made no secret that he was charging $50,000 a person for his instant enlightenment seminars. Didn’t anyone think that was just a tad excessive? It doesn’t sound like Genpo has any intention of not doing that anymore. He’s just going to be a little more careful about where he puts his penis.

I don’t care where he puts his penis! I’m sorry for the pain and suffering his wife and kids and his girlfriend had to endure. And it does show a lack of judgment and honesty that could reflect on other areas of his life and teaching. But it is so completely removed from the more truly damaging stuff he’s been doing (and apparently intends to go right on doing) that it hardly even registers as far as I’m concerned.

Sexual misconduct is a serious matter in Buddhist practice. It is one of the top ten things we vow not to do when we declare to the world our intention of following the Buddha Way. Long ago the Buddhist order tried to specifically define what is and is not sexual misconduct. But many centuries before any of us were born they realized that what constitutes sexual misconduct is very much tied to the society you live in and the attitudes of the people you interact with. There can never be any universal definition of sexual misconduct. Nevertheless there is still a universal thing that we can call “sexual misconduct” in spite of the fact that the specifics of what it is are so variable. Therefore we vow not to conduct ourselves wrongly in the area of sexuality. Then we have to figure out for ourselves what precisely that means in our own lives and in the lives of those we interact with.

It sounds to me like Genpo probably did engage in sexual misconduct. He clearly defines his behavior as such. In another instance having sex with someone other than the person you married would not be sexual misconduct. There are many married couples who do not feel that extra-marital sex is sexual misconduct. There are even entire societies who do not feel sex outside of marriage is anything to get too worked up about.

This is why these sex-related allegations against Genpo mean nothing at all to me. For all I know maybe Genpo and his wife were swingers and the affair was not nearly so hurtful as he’s making it out to be. He could just be too ashamed to admit it and is taking this public stance as a way of avoiding doing so. I don’t know and I don’t care very much. I don’t even understand why everyone else seems so overwrought about it.

There is another issue, though, that I am personally concerned about regarding this scandal. Some people have misread my book, Zen Wrapped in Karma Dipped in Chocolate, as containing the revelation that I had an affair with one of my Zen students. Some have even so deeply misconstrued the book as to believe it says I had two affairs with two students. In fact, I fell in love with a woman who had come to a handful of the Zen classes I taught and then stopped attending them a few months before we got together. The other woman mentioned in the book was not only not a Zen student, she had not even the slightest interest in Buddhism. Neither of them ever entered into anything like a formal teacher/student relationship with me. In Zen, the teacher/student relationship is a clearly defined thing that involves a specific public declaration and ceremony.

Even so, this experience led me to understand how and why teacher/student love affairs develop so frequently in the Zen community as well as in other spiritual communities. Most of them are nothing at all like what happened with Genpo. There is no deception, no cheating on spouses, and no abuse of power going on in the majority of these relationships. They are simply cases of people finding mutual attraction based on a deeply held interest that precious few people can even understand let alone share. Where else would an un-partnered Zen teacher be most likely to encounter a person like that other than among her students? Sure there are six billion other people on the planet, as one guy pointed out on Facebook regarding Genpo, but how many of them are committed practitioners of the thing that that un-partnered teacher has dedicated her life to?

Unfortunately for these lucky people who have been able to find their so-called “soul mates,” the Genpo case may very well be absorbed into the psyches of the rest of their community and lead them to believe that something terrible is going on when really nothing could be further from the truth. Besides the whole Big Mind® mess, this is what saddens me most about the Genpo Roshi affair.

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: Big Mind® is a deeply hurtful and dangerous technique that goes absolutely against the real teachings of Soto style Zen Buddhism. It is far more unethical and immoral to run a Big Mind® seminar than it is to cheat on your spouse. The potential damage far surpasses anything a love affair could produce. I’ve written more extensively about this on my blog.

Buddhist style “enlightenment experiences” (I despise this term, but it’s in common use, so I’m stuck with it) are not something one should take lightly. There’s a very good reason why Zen teachers for thousands of years have cautioned their students to go very slowly and cautiously along the path. These sudden breakthroughs can seem very thrilling when they happen. People might even pay good money for them. But they can also mess your mind up in a very big way if you go into them unprepared. Yet here’s old loving Genpo making it so you can walk in off the street and have one in a couple hours. That’s like giving random people massive doses of LSD and saying, “Here! It’s fun! Now you’re going to see God and love everyone in the world!”

And Genpo has vowed to keep right on doing it. Wonderful. Just wonderful.

* And poor Ken Wilber! He’s up there on YouTube (see below) from a couple years ago telling the world, “Isn’t Genpo Roshi about the most amazing thing you’ve ever seen? It’s not just Genpo as a human being and as an Enlightened human being. He’s a deeply, deeply decent human being. Which is much harder than being enlightened, incidentally.”

YouTube Preview Image

**Hey former Genpo followers! I’m struggling to find a way to pay the rent on a cheap apartment in one of the most rundown communities in America. If you really want to stick it to Genpo, why not take away one of his houses, sell it, and give the money to his worst arch-enemy and nemesis — me? Then I’ll buy myself one house and it’ll all be even steven. Hit me up. We’ll talk.

Brad Warner is a Zen monk and author of Sex Sin and Zen: A Buddhist Exploration of Sex from Celibacy to Polyamory and Everything in Between, Sit Down and Shut Up! and Zen Wrapped in Karma Dipped in Chocolate. He maintains a blog about Buddhist stuff.

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RELATED LINKS:

How To Respond??? Genpo Merzel (Discussion on Integral Life)
Genpo Merzel Disrobes (Tricycle)
Genpo Roshi Falls Again (Buddhist Buzz)

Wikipedia on Dennis Genpo Merzel
Big Mind Website

Integral Controversies (Integral NHNE)

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9 comments

  1. David

    Brad, I’m no expert on Zen Buddhism, but your discourse on Roshi seems rather lacking in empathy and does not really promote the wellbeing of others. In essence, I guess I’m surprised that a Zen Monk would be so critical, harsh and smug about this issue. I don’t mean to be disrespectful to you but how different is Roshi’s bad behavior from yours?

  2. Hi David. If you want Brad to see your comment, you’ll need to post it on the site that originally published his article. Here’s where to go:

    http://www.elephantjournal.com/2011/02/disrobing-genpo–brad-warner/

    Also, I agree with you that it would be helpful if Brad could share his perspectives with less bluster and more compassion.

  3. David

    Thanks

  4. Andy

    I really liked this blog, and don’t agree at all with the other two commenters who thought it showed lack of empathy or compassion. I think Brad is totally on when he says that the far greater transgression is the phony teaching, not the extra-marital affair. And I’m not clear at all how showing more compassion towards a fraud is going to help him change, when his confessional statement never mentions or shows the slightest bit of awareness of the greater problem.

    I’m very used to encountering the BS by phony gurus like Genpo, but even I was shocked to learn there are people out there so gullible they would pay $50,000 for it. I think Brad is doing Genpo and his followers a big favor by giving him what Wilber has called tough love. If tough love is fair for students, isn’t it even more appropriate for gurus?

  5. karmanot

    And we thought Richard Baker was a big whoop. Wonder what Ikkyu thinks?

  6. Eli

    I appreciate point David’s points about the extent to which a breach of trust could possibly extend beyond the singular issue of Genpo’s extramarital affair: the possibility of his “disrobing” being a public narrative that, to some degree, may be hiding other layers of ethically questionable motives or actions.
    Along the lines of “sexual misconduct is very much tied to the society you live in”, I agree that the US can and should and does have a society that tolerates value communities that practice open marriages, even though I would not do it. The key word here is “tolerate”. I feel that, culturally, nations and states tend to have cultural (as related yet differentiated from society, btw) centers of gravity, that are often reflected (either as confirmation or contrast) by public figures. Because Genpo lives such a public life, I feel that his response is articulated in rather evolved terms, yet also framed along the lines of conventional values that, for better or for worse, seem to comprise the predominant PUBLIC image of ethics and morality in the US.
    So, yes, his extramarital affair was unethical. Personally, because he violated a covenant that he claimed to have entered into willingly; and secondly, because whether he likes it or not, as a public figure his actions will bump up against the locus of conventional values that I am justified in claiming to simply feel, as an actively curious and concerned US citizen.
    Ultimately, I cannot fully respond to this so-called “disrobing”, as is the case for most of us who simply don’t know the extent of this seemingly painful situation.
    As far as the dangers of Big Mind, I’ve never been left with the impression that I would actually become “enlightened” in the classic sense of the word through this practice. Big Mind, unlike Super Mind, is a horizontal, state-oriented practice: meaning, it helps us live and be more adequately where we are now. This may or may not lead to more profound vertical types of awakening, radical re-organizations of one’s psyche, but the point is that it offers a new modality to help us be more transparent to ourselves, while partially anchored in psychological traditions that help scaffold minds conditioned to the cultural norms of various western societies and cultures.

  7. Alan

    Spoken from pure jealousy, hatred and guile. Yikes – may he get over himself

  8. Miranda

    I couldn’t even finish reading what you have to say about genpo.. And then finding at the bottom that you are also a monk I had to laugh.. You have quite a lot to say and it’s quite arrogant and angry.. Never knew there was another practice in the Buddhist way.. What happened to treat others the way you be treated.. You’re words regardless of his actions are not coming from a good place.. Sounds like you still have some internal happiness to look for..

  9. Abby

    I must second David. I am also not an expert in Zen Buddhism but this epithet sounds like it comes from hateful rather than enlightned place. The people I have know in my life that are able to write such scathing reviews of others undoubtedly have deep insecurities of their own that will and do cause them to behave in ways very similar to the person you are critical of. Perhaps we could both learn a little about ourselves based on the way we have reacted.

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